Gambling Law Sportsbook

Watchdogs Banned Betting Advertisements Using Managers From The Premier League, Such As Eddie Howe And Frank Lampard, For Fear That They Would Encourage Young People To Gamble

Because they might appeal to people under 18, Watchdog ASA banned the advertisements.

Watchdogs Banned Betting Advertisements Using Managers From The Premier League, Such As Eddie Howe And Frank Lampard, For Fear That They Would Encourage Young People To Gamble
Watchdogs Banned Betting Advertisements Using Managers From The Premier League, Such As Eddie Howe And Frank Lampard, For Fear That They Would Encourage Young People To Gamble

Watchdogs have prohibited gambling advertisements with managers from the Premier League, such as Eddie Howe and Frank Lampard.

According to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), the adverts, which were part of a marketing campaign for betting giant Ladbrokes, ran the danger of inciting young people to gamble.

The bookmaker's first two sponsored tweets in January and February included two pictures of Eddie Howe, who led Saudi-owned Newcastle to the Champions League.

With the title "Ladbrokes next manager to leave odds" and four more well-known names, including Frank Lampard, David Moyes, Brendan Rodgers, and Gary O'Neil, the second tweet they suggested gambling on which manager would most likely be fired.

ASA stated: 'We noted the ads included Eddie Howe, David Moyes, Frank Lampard, Brendan Rodgers and Gary O'Neil, who at the time of publication were all current Premier League managers and would be well known to those who followed football, and in particular fans of the clubs they managed, including children.

'We considered, based on those factors, that all five managers were likely to be of strong appeal to under-18s.' 

The regulator further stated:  'We acknowledged that the ads were targeted at over-25s, but, because Twitter was a media environment where users self-verified on customer sign-up and did not use robust age-verification, we considered that Ladbrokes had not excluded under-18s from the audience with the highest level of accuracy required for ads the content of which was likely to appeal strongly to under-18s.'

The ASA determined the advertisements were careless and could not be shown again.

Ladbrokes defended itself by claiming that the first tweet did not point users to the company's website where they could make bets and that users could only see the tweets once Twitter verified that they were over 18.

Ladbrokes agreed that the second tweet was commercial because it provided market odds for the next Premier League manager to be fired. It also claimed that the photograph of the managers had been included "inadvertently," in violation of its policies.

The bookmaker informed the ASA that it had taken measures to ensure that such content would be evaluated more carefully to ensure compliance with advertising regulations.

Powered by Froala Editor

iGaming
iGaming Business
Premier League
Gambling Law
Watchdog

iGaming News • UK